Health Wellness

  • FDA review favors first drug for HIV prevention
    A1_20120217090003_320_240 2012-05-10 18:46:02 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A pill that has long been used to treat HIV has moved one step closer to becoming the first drug approved to prevent healthy people from becoming infected with the virus that causes AIDS. The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that Gilead Sciences' Truvada appears to b...

  • New blood test for fetal anomalies being launched
    S-harmony-prenatal-test-large 2012-05-10 18:40:02 UTC
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — A new, noninvasive test to detect certain fetal abnormalities early in pregnancy is being launched and should be widely available next month. The Harmony Prenatal Test can detect whether a fetus has an extra chromosome, instead of the normal pair. Such abnormalities, ca...

  • Report: Schools key to fighting America's obesity
    A604caf2-22ec-4425-bd15-76f18357b414 2012-05-10 20:04:08 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Fighting obesity will require changes everywhere Americans live, work, play and learn, says a major new report that outlines dozens of options — from building more walkable neighborhoods to zoning limits on fast-food restaurants to selling healthier snacks in sports arenas. B...

  • FDA: Kids' medical tests need child-size radiation
    470_cancer_110301 2012-05-09 15:15:35 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The government is taking steps to help ensure that children who need CT scans and other X-ray-based tests don't get an adult-sized dose of radiation. Too much radiation from medical testing is a growing concern, especially for children, because it may increase the risk of can...

  • Study ties fertility treatment, birth defect risk
    Study_ties_fertility_treatment__birth_defect_risk_ 2012-05-05 16:34:18 UTC
    Test-tube babies have higher rates of birth defects, and doctors have long wondered: Is it because of certain fertility treatments or infertility itself? A large new study from Australia suggests both may play a role. Compared to those conceived naturally, babies that resulted from simple IVF,...

  • Salmonella in dog food sickens 14 people across US
    120430111532_dog-food 2012-05-05 16:41:14 UTC
    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Federal health officials say at least 14 people in nine states have been infected with salmonella from tainted dog food made at a South Carolina plant. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said no deaths have been reported, but at least five people have been hos...

  • CDC report: More teen girls use best birth control
    Teen 2012-05-03 18:55:59 UTC
    ATLANTA (AP) — Health officials say more teen girls use the best kinds of birth control. A recent survey found 60 percent of teen girls who have sex use the most effective kinds of contraception. That's up from the mid-90s, when less than half were using the best. Health officials say the t...

  • Number of US newborns with drug withdrawal triples
    Untitled 2012-05-01 17:56:16 UTC
    CHICAGO (AP) — Less than a month old, Savannah Dannelley scrunches her tiny face into a scowl as a nurse gently squirts a dose of methadone into her mouth. The infant is going through drug withdrawal and is being treated with the same narcotic prescribed for her mother to fight addiction to po...

  • Scientists urge balance of consumption to fight poverty
    0__15912096_401_00 2012-05-01 01:42:15 UTC
    A group of 23 scientists from across the globe have called for a drastic rethink on consumption to fight poverty as global population rises. They say incentives and regulation are needed to achieve a balance. Levels of consumption between developing and developed nations must be rebalanced to fi...

  • Serena says diet change to support Venus not hard
    9576b0_serena_04272012 2012-04-28 23:15:11 UTC
    NEW YORK (AP) — Serena Williams says altering her diet in support of big sister Venus hasn't been much of a hardship. Serena said she's cut down on eating chicken and fish and is eating more raw foods like Venus, who adopted the change to help her body cope with Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmu...

  • Marathon runner's death inspires $1M in donations
    Untitled 2012-04-25 19:34:10 UTC
    LONDON (AP) — Donations to the charity supported by a 30-year-old woman who died during the London Marathon topped $1 million on Wednesday as thousands took up her cause. Claire Squires entered the race to raise money for an organization that helps prevent suicides and had collected about $800...

  • Metlife, 20 states reach settlement near $500M
    -5a293be18ce5d098 2012-04-23 18:52:49 UTC
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — MetLife Inc. has agreed to pay nearly $500 million in a 20-state settlement over allegations it didn't pay life insurance benefits to some of its policyholders. The largest life insurer in the United States said Monday that it expects to pay about $188 million of the approxi...

  • SF restaurant known for 'rudest waiter' closing
    Untitled_2 2012-04-21 06:40:32 UTC
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A 100-year-old Chinese restaurant in San Francisco once known for having "the world's rudest waiter" is slinging its last insults and barbequed pork noodle rolls. Sam Wo, a Chinatown hole-in-the-wall that typified the kind of ethnic eateries for which the city's culinary s...

  • Happy? Positive outlook may be good for your heart
    Optimist_use 2013-03-25 03:27:05 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Be happy — it seems to be good for your heart. Scientists have long known that Type A personalities and people who are chronically angry, anxious or depressed have a higher risk of heart attacks. Now a Harvard review of the flip side of that psychology concludes that being...

  • Study suggests breast cancer is clutch of 10 diseases
    Breast_cancer_symptoms 2012-04-18 18:02:27 UTC
    LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists who conducted a major international study into the genetics of breast cancer say they can now classify the disease into 10 subtypes - a finding that points to more accurate, tailored treatment for individual patients in future. In research published in the journal...

  • Drugs in Drinking Water
    Untitled 2012-04-17 08:41:29 UTC
    Not just fluoride, which is bad enough - much of our drinking water, in the U.S., Canada and U.K. at least, is contaminated with Prozac and a "vast array" of other drugs. And you wonder why everyone around is sleepwalking and/or sick? A vast array of pharmaceuticals — including antibiotics, ant...

  • New version of female condom touted
    Fc2_say_-_female_condom 2012-04-16 23:32:38 UTC
    New York (Associated press)— Advocates of the female condom are promoting a less costly, more user-friendly version that they hope will vastly expand its role in the global fight against AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. An early version of the female condom was introduced in 1993, a...

  • 10 Foods That Fight Spring Allergies
    Broccoli_-_orange 2012-04-12 07:40:09 UTC
    Thanks to climate change, every allergy season is the worst allergy season ever. Warmer temperatures have led to earlier springs and longer allergy seasons, while higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have led to more potent and allergenic pollen. This year is no different. A mild ...

  • 25 Best Cities for Staying Young
    Farmers_market 2012-04-12 06:22:17 UTC
    Is your city keeping you young, or making you old before your time? The RealAge 2012 Youngest & Oldest Cities in America report employed RealAge Test results from more than 28 million people to rank America's 50 largest metropolitan areas to uncover the best places to stay young. "Aging is ine...

  • Next generation of doctors sees gloomy future
    Doctor_with_cash_page 2012-04-11 16:46:39 UTC
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A majority of young doctors feel pessimistic about the future of the U.S. healthcare system, with the new healthcare law cited as the main reason, according to a survey released to Reuters on Wednesday. Nearly half of the 500 doctors surveyed think the Affordable Care Ac...

  • Baby alive after 12 hours in morgue
    World_news_7-1_jpg_672986a 2012-04-11 15:56:58 UTC
    A woman who insisted on seeing the presumably lifeless body of her premature baby has found the infant alive in the drawer of a hospital morgue. Authorities say the girl had spent 12 hours in the refrigerated room at the Perrando de Resistencia hospital in northern Argentina. Analia Bouter ...

  • Hospitals pressured to end free baby formula
    Breastfeedingnewborn-537x368 2012-04-09 20:02:19 UTC
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - New parents leaving U.S. hospitals often take home a corporate gift along with their babies: a tote bag filled with infant formula. Consumer advocates want to end the giveaways, which they say undermine breastfeeding. In a letter to more than 2,600 hospitals, dozens of c...

  • Kansas winner of Mega Millions lottery comes forward
    Representative_mark_meadows 2012-04-08 07:11:47 UTC
    (Reuters) - A Kansas winner of a share of the record U.S. $656 million Mega Millions lottery claimed the cash on Friday, nearly a week after becoming one of three winners of the historic jackpot, lottery officials said. The winner asked to remain anonymous, and officials declined to detail the...

  • Kuwaiti artist "more determined" after exhibition ban
    Kuweit3 2012-04-08 07:01:31 UTC
    KUWAIT (Reuters) - A Kuwaiti artist whose pictures of men were deemed "obscene" by authorities said she would keep on producing art that challenged perceptions of society in the Gulf Arab state after her exhibition was shut down. Officials sent by the government told the gallery showing Shuroo...

  • How Much Vitamin D Should I Take?
    How_much_vitamin_d_should_i_take_ 2020-12-28 19:18:56 UTC
    How much vitamin D do you need to ensure strong, healthy bones? Unfortunately, there isn’t an easy answer. “It’s incredibly controversial,” says Neil Binkley, MD, a UW Health geriatrician and internationally recognized researcher who leads the UW Osteoporosis Clinical Research Program. “The ex...