Health Wellness

  • Ageing: The girls who never grow older
    Diaalnews.com-ageing-_the_girls_who_never_grow_older 2014-07-28 07:12:56 UTC
    A handful of girls seem to defy one of the biggest certainties in life: ageing. Virginia Hughes reports on the families wrestling with a condition they can’t explain, and the scientist who believes that these children could hold the key to immortality. Richard Walker has been trying to conquer...

  • Call To Action: 'Arrogance' of ignoring need for sleep
    Ignoring_the_importance_of_sleep-diaalnews.com 2014-05-16 20:26:48 UTC
    Scientists from Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Manchester and Surrey universities warn cutting sleep is leading to "serious health problems". They say people and governments need to take the problem seriously. Cancer, heart disease, type-2 diabetes, infections and obesity have all been linked ...

  • Antibiotics: World faces huge public health threat - WHO
    Antibiotics-diaalnews.com 2014-05-01 12:35:13 UTC
    The World Health Organisations says: 'The world is headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries can once again kill.' Pneumonia will again become a feared killer, surgery risky and diarrhoea fatal if urgent action is not taken to preserve the power of current...

  • Try thinking of yourself as a pea, instead of a human
    Pea-diaalnews.com 2014-04-10 05:42:06 UTC
    For those concerned about climate change, the ultra-conservative Heartland Institute offers up a calming solution: try thinking of yourself as a pea, instead of a human. Peas in a lab sprouted faster with extreme concentrations of carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas mainly responsible for climate ...

  • EU to impose stricter rules on organic products
    Diaalnews 2014-03-26 04:02:05 UTC
    <h3>How green are organic products really? Consumers are increasingly uncertain. In order to win back their trust, the EU Commission now wants to implement stricter regulations for products with an organic seal.</h3> Pesticide-ladentomatoes and falsely declared olive oil - scandals in the organi...

  • Vitamin A deficiency during pregnancy hurts immune development
    Broccoli_carrots 2014-03-23 07:08:13 UTC
    Adequate vitamin A intake during pregnancy is needed for offspring to fully develop an immune system and fend off disease, researchers working with mice report March 19 in Nature. Vitamin A is plentiful in egg yolks, fish, carrots, yellow sweet potatoes, spinach, butternut squash and other foo...

  • 'Chocolate' pills for heart health
    Chocolat-heart-pills-diaalnews.com 2014-03-17 20:16:15 UTC
    It won't be nearly as much fun as eating candy bars, but a big study is being launched to see if pills containing the nutrients in dark chocolate can help prevent heart attacks and strokes. The pills are so packed with nutrients that you'd have to eat a gazillion candy bars to get the amount b...

  • New food labels would highlight calories and sugar
    Study-_foods_high_in_flavonoids_could_slow_down_cognitive_decline 2014-02-27 08:12:10 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Those "Nutrition Facts" labels that are plastered on nearly every food package found in grocery stores are getting a new look. Calories would be in larger, bolder type, and consumers for the first time would know whether foods have added sugars under label changes being p...

  • Dyslexia unscientific and lacks meaning, warn academics
    Dyslexia_may_not_exist__warn_academics 2014-02-27 06:41:25 UTC
    Dyslexia may not exist, warn academics. Experts at Durham and Yale Universities are calling for the term ‘dyslexia’ to be abandoned because it is unscientific and lacks meaning. Millions of children may have been wrongly diagnosed as dyslexic after academics found the condition probably does not...

  • The honest image of a woman's body
    Diaalnews 2014-02-14 07:18:27 UTC
    Beth Whaanga's photographs of her cancer scars, Jade Beall's images of 'pregnancy stretchmarks' and Gabi Gregg's 'fat women in swimwear' could change our view of 'perfection' How radical and provocative is an honest image of a woman's body? Beth Whaanga, a mother of four from Brisbane, Austral...

  • Belgium set to extend right-to-die law to children
    26af82e4a97ab2044a0f6a706700c5c0 2014-02-11 22:09:23 UTC
    BRUSSELS (AP) — Belgium, one of the very few countries where euthanasia is legal, is expected to take the unprecedented step this week of abolishing age restrictions on who can ask to be put to death — extending the right to children for the first time. The legislation appears to have wide sup...

  • Caffeine common in kids, young adults; mainly soda
    Us_tests_covid-19_vaccines_for_kids 2014-02-11 08:16:49 UTC
    CHICAGO (AP) — Nearly 3 out of 4 U.S. children and young adults consume at least some caffeine, mostly from soda, tea and coffee. The rate didn't budge much over a decade, although soda use declined and energy drinks became an increasingly common source, a government analysis finds. Though eve...

  • The Dark Side of Kale, Spinach, Broccoli, Etc. — Thyroid Disease
    Kale-diaalnews.com 2014-02-08 03:10:01 UTC
    Kale is considered healthy, hip, trendy -- it was undoubtedly 2013's "it" vegetable, and all signs point to continued kale-mania in 2014. But on January 1st of this year, Jennifer Berman wrote a op-ed piece in the New York Times - titled Kale? Juicing? Trouble Ahead, in which she described recen...

  • Cancer cases expected to soar by 70% over next 20 years
    To_detect_deadliest_cancers_just_by_blood_test 2014-02-03 22:25:37 UTC
    <h3>New cancer cases expected to grow from 14m a year in 2012 to 25m, with biggest burden in low- and middle-income countries</h3> Cancer cases worldwide are predicted to increase by 70% over the next two decades, from 14m in 2012 to 25m new cases a year, according to the World Health Organisa...

  • Steroid use much higher among gay and bi teen boys
    Steroids_purchased-news 2014-02-03 07:16:38 UTC
    CHICAGO (AP) — Gay and bisexual teen boys use illicit steroids at a rate almost six times higher than do straight kids, a "dramatic disparity" that points up a need to reach out to this group, researchers say. Reasons for the differences are unclear. The study authors said it's possible gay an...

  • The 102-year-old Frenchman sets world record
    102__cycles-news 2014-02-01 09:25:32 UTC
    SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France (AP) — Age hasn't slowed cyclist Robert Marchand. The 102-year-old Frenchman broke his own world record in the over-100s category Friday, riding 26.927 kilometers (16.7 miles) in one hour, more than 2.5 kilometers better than his previous best time in the race...

  • Why city life may be bad for you
    A_voodoo_pilgrim 2014-01-30 10:33:18 UTC
    When it comes to getting people to be more active, much of the attention is focused on the improving sports facilities, encouraging people to join the gym or lambasting schools for not doing enough PE. But could another crucial factor be the way neighbourhoods are designed? The Royal Instit...

  • AP Exclusive: New regs sought for child car seats
    0001se2obbk09bua-c116-f4 2014-01-22 10:32:44 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Child car seats would for the first time have to protect children from death and injury in side-impact crashes under regulations the government is proposing, The Associated Press has learned. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration seeks to upgrade standards for ch...

  • Childern: Health Effects of Excessive TV Watching
    Us_president_trump_tried_to_blackmail_the_hosts_of_msnbc's_%e2%80%9cmorning_joe%e2%80%9d 2014-01-16 23:17:42 UTC
    The following list some of the adverse Effects of Television on Child Health from spending too much time with TV and videos. <h3>Overweight and Diabetes</h3> Children and TV Statistics: The number of children and adolescents who are overweight or obese has doubled in the past 20 years in t...

  • Chemical spill a blow to W.Va. capital's economy
    Chemical_spill_shuts_down_much_of_w.va._capital-diaalnews.com 2014-01-12 09:38:06 UTC
    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — On the third day without clean tap water, business owners with empty dining rooms and quiet aisles of merchandise around West Virginia's capital were left to wonder how much of an economic hit they'll take from a chemical spill. Most visitors have cleared out of Charle...

  • Food companies cut 6.4 trillion calories
    Whole_foods'_competitors_fear_amazon_price_cuts 2014-01-09 10:14:56 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Some of the nation's largest food companies have cut calories in their products by more than 6.4 trillion, according to a new study. The study sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that between 2007 and 2012 the companies reduced their products' calories by th...

  • Marketing efforts to uninsured youth ramp up
    E865d91d28b9b500470f6a7067009112 2014-01-02 07:03:38 UTC
    MIAMI (AP) — The so-called "young invincibles" are so important to the success of the Affordable Care Act that supporters and detractors are spending millions to reach them with racy ads, social media campaigns and celebrity endorsements. The president is even (gasp) asking their mothers to help ...

  • Vitamin E may slow Alzheimer's disease progression
    Studies-_vitamin_d__zinc__quercetin_could_prevent_and_treat_covid-19 2013-12-31 21:35:54 UTC
    Researchers say vitamin E might slow the progression of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease — the first time any treatment has been shown to alter the course of dementia at that stage. In a study of more than 600 older veterans, high doses of the vitamin delayed the decline in daily living sk...

  • Drug blocks HIV in lab study, human tests planned
    U.s._pushes_forward_with_emergency_use_of_drug_for_covid-19 2013-12-23 17:30:54 UTC
    NEW YORK (AP) — Can an experimental drug developed to treat epilepsy block the AIDS virus? A preliminary lab study suggests it’s possible, and researchers are eager to try it in people. Scientists experimented with the drug after uncovering details of how they believe HIV cripples the immune s...

  • FDA: Anti-bacterial soaps may not curb bacteria
    Anti-bacterial-diaalnews.com 2013-12-17 02:04:24 UTC
    WASHINGTON (AP) — After more than 40 years of study, the U.S. government says it has found no evidence that common anti-bacterial soaps prevent the spread of germs, and regulators want the makers of Dawn, Dial and other household staples to prove that their products do not pose health risks to co...